fathom-the-universe
fathom-the-universe:

Tardigrades may be the toughest animals on earth

The Tardigrade or “Waterbear” is a tiny (0.5 mm or0.020 in) animal that inhabits mosses and ferns. The Tardigrade has existed on earth for half a billion years and it is known as an extremophile, meaning it can survive conditions that would kill nearly any other living creature.
Tardigrades can withstand temperatures from just above absolute zero to well above the boiling point of water, pressures about six times greater than those found in the deepest ocean trenches, ionizing radiation at doses hundreds of times higher than the lethal dose for a human, and they can survive the vacuum of outer space. 
They can also go without food or water for more than 10 years, drying out to the point where they are 3% or less water, only to re-hydrate and come back to life..

The impressive abilities make the Tardigrade one of the most indestructible animals on earth.

Fathom the Universe

Read more: http://tvblogs.nationalgeographic.com/2014/03/19/5-reasons-why-the-tardigrade-is-natures-toughest-animal/

fathom-the-universe:

Tardigrades may be the toughest animals on earth

The Tardigrade or “Waterbear” is a tiny (0.5 mm or0.020 in) animal that inhabits mosses and ferns. The Tardigrade has existed on earth for half a billion years and it is known as an extremophile, meaning it can survive conditions that would kill nearly any other living creature.

Tardigrades can withstand temperatures from just above absolute zero to well above the boiling point of water, pressures about six times greater than those found in the deepest ocean trenches, ionizing radiation at doses hundreds of times higher than the lethal dose for a human, and they can survive the vacuum of outer space.

They can also go without food or water for more than 10 years, drying out to the point where they are 3% or less water, only to re-hydrate and come back to life..

The impressive abilities make the Tardigrade one of the most indestructible animals on earth.

Fathom the Universe

Read more: http://tvblogs.nationalgeographic.com/2014/03/19/5-reasons-why-the-tardigrade-is-natures-toughest-animal/

micdotcom

micdotcom:

Face it, Taylor Swift’s “Shake It Off” is going to get stuck in your head

The song’s video is offensively vanilla in its PG insistence that twerking is risque (see below), but the song itself is almost ruthlessly catchy. With a central horn line straight from Max Martin’s 2014 playbook, a classic Swift hook and oft-repeated lyrics taking down Swift’s haters, she has once again proven that she’s a pop savant. 

When you can expect her new album ‘1989’ | Follow micdotcom

jtotheizzoe

jtotheizzoe:

thebrainscoop:

Science Needs Women: 
For Women in Science; the L’Oreal Foundation 

I’m sharing this video on any platform I can because when I first found it last week it had something like 1,400 views, but it’s the most beautifully produced and succinctly narrated video addressing some of the most complicated issues facing women in STE(A)M fields I’ve found yet. 

I’m sharing this for every time I’m called a “feminazi.”

…for every time I’m told that my concerns aren’t valid, our that our issues are imagined.

…for every time I hear “women just don’t like science,” or worse - “women just aren’t good at science.”

…for every time we’re told that we can have a family or a career, but not both - and for every time we feel like we have to decide between the two.

…for every time a study comes out saying as many as 64% of women endure sexual harassment during field work

…for the fact that women earn 41% of PhD’s in STEM fields, but make up only 28% of tenure-track faculty in those fields.

…and because we need more women mentors in these fields to stand up for issues that are not “women’s issues” - these are people issues that affect our collective society as a whole.

The women in this video are my heroes and they should be your heroes, too.

Science needs women.